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The ancestral lands of Ngāti Kearoa Ngāti Tuara surround our sacred maunga, Te Horohoroinga o ngā ringa o Kahumatamomoe and have been occupied by our hapū for over five hundred years. Our hapū have lived and travelled between Horohoro and Tihiotonga (from the Pukehangi area back to mamaku, known as the Te Paiaka block) and our kaumatua tell stories of travelling and hunting in the area. Our environmental team has been working on the Horohoro maunga since 2018 building our pest control capacity within the hapū. This new project will be extending our operational area to include conservation on the Te Paiaka block. Restoring the mauri of the forest to maintain a healthy and functioning forest ecosystem, will at a minimum require controlling of possums, rats, mustelids, wallabies, deer and pigs to very low levels, which will create a safer environment for all of our taonga species.

Te Runanga o Ngāti Kea Ngāti Tuara Charitable Trust is the governance entity that has management oversight for this project.


Operational Work


  • Long-tailed bat Monitoring

    Long-tailed bat monitoring carried out on Horohoro Maunga

  • Pest Control Operation

    Pest control targeting possums, rodents and mustelids over 1240ha on Horohoro Maunga; and 180 ha on Te Paiaka block.

  • Track Cutting and Marking

    Track cutting and marking will take place over the total 1230ha area on Horohoro Maunga; and 180 ha on Te Paiaka block.

  • Rodent Control

    Focused rodent control around identified bat maternity roosts

  • Education and Engagement

    Support our hapū by hosting wananga and sharing knowledge of our maunga and taonga species

Taonga Species

Protecting taonga species is crucial for preserving the biodiversity and cultural heritage of Ngāti Kea Ngāti Tuara
  • Pekapeka Long Tailed Bats

    Pekapeka are a unique and important species native to New Zealand. They are the only native land mammals found in the country and play a crucial role in pollinating native plants and dispersing seeds. Unfortunately, their populations have been declining due to habitat loss, predation by introduced mammals, and disease. Conservation efforts by Ngāti Kea Ngāti Tuara are underway to protect and restore the habitats of these bats.

  • Kereru

    The Kererū are known for their distinctive green and white plumage, as well as their loud wingbeats and distinctive cooing calls. Kererū play a crucial role in New Zealand's ecosystem, as they are important seed dispersers for many native plants. Unfortunately, their populations have been declining due to habitat loss, predation by introduced mammals, and hunting. The development of predator control networks by Ngāti Kea Ngāti Tuara are helping to protect Kererū within their rohe.

  • Toutouwai North Island Robin

    The Toutouwai is a charming and unique bird known for their inquisitive personalities and their friendly interactions. They help to control insect populations and disperse seeds for native plant species. Populations have been declining due to habitat loss, predation by introduced mammals, and climate change.

  • Hangehange

    Hangehange is a unique plant known for its striking yellow flowers and its medicinal properties, which have been used by Maori for centuries to treat a range of ailments. Hangehange provides food and shelter for native wildlife and helps to prevent soil erosion. Unfortunately, the plant is threatened by habitat loss and competition from invasive species. Conservation efforts are underway to protect and restore the habitats of Hangehange by Ngāti Kea Ngāti Tuara.

    Photo Credit: Phil Bendle

  • Toropapa

    Toropapa, also known as the Red Mistletoe, is a parasitic plant species known for its bright red flowers and its important role in the ecosystem. Toropapa is also an important cultural plant for Maori, who traditionally used it for medicine and as a dye. The plant is threatend and conservation efforts are underway!

  • Raukawa

    Raukawa, also known as the Kawakawa tree, is known for its distinctive heart-shaped leaves and its medicinal properties, which have been used by Maori for centuries to treat a range of ailments. It is also an important cultural plant for Maori, who traditionally used it for weaving, medicine, and as a spice. By protecting Raukawa and other native plant species, we can help to preserve the biodiversity and cultural significance of New Zealand's unique flora and fauna.

  • Kanokano / Manomano

    Kanokano is a fern species known for its distinctive shiny fronds and its ability to grow in a variety of habitats, including rock crevices and forest floors. Kanokano provides habitat for many native invertebrate species. Unfortunately, the plant is threatened by habitat loss and competition from invasive species.


tama whariua

Ngāti Kearoa Ngāti Tuara at the Manaaki Kaimai Mamaku Handover Ceremony. Robyn Bargh (Chairperson), Brian Bargh (Volunteer trapper), Kataraina George (Project Manager), Kyle Kiel (Kaimahi).